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Otherworld North East
Studies in the Unexplained

Website design and content © Otherworld North East 2003-2015
unless otherwise stated

The opinions expressed on this website belong to the individual authors, who also retain copyright of their own material

North East Paranormal | Newcastle Paranormal | Durham Paranormal | Northumberland Paranormal

Otherworld North East
Studies in the Unexplained

Website design and content © Otherworld North East 2003-2016
unless otherwise stated.

The opinions expressed on this website belong to the individual authors, who also retain copyright of their own material.

North East Paranormal | Newcastle Paranormal | Durham Paranormal | Northumberland Paranormal


An Interview with Nick Redfern

Nick RedfernInterview by Lee D. MunroNick Redfern is a freelance author and journalist. Having cut his journalistic teeth after leaving school with the music magazine Zero, he moved on to write for many mainstream newspapers and magazines.

Alongside his mainstream writing, Nick also combined his journalistic background with his longtime Fortean interests, an effort that culminated in many published books in the areas of cryptozoology and UFOs.  His most recent books include Final Events and The Real Men In Black.

Always a respected researcher and author with years of experience in the field, Nick’s views may at times seem controversial to mainstream Fortean thinking and theories, but they are always interesting.

OWNE both welcomes and thanks Nick Redfern for undertaking the interview.

Hi Nick.  First, thanks for taking the time to talk to us.  I’d like to start with a Trans-Atlantic perspective on your Fortean and anomalous research. You were born and raised in the UK but are also a long time resident in the US, and have written and investigated in both.  Have you noticed any differences in either the type of phenomena or how it manifests, between the UK & US?  Superficially at least, I get the impression there are more conspiratorial and UFO/alien (inc. Abduction, cattle mutilation etc) reports and phenomenon Stateside for example.

The nature of the phenomena that I investigate over here in the US (I have lived here about 11 years, just outside Dallas, Texas) doesn’t radically differ from that which I used to investigate in England. By that, I mean my two main areas of interest in terms of writing are Cryptozoology and Ufology. So, in the same way that in the UK there are sightings of lake-monsters, big-cats etc, in the US there are similar things, plus creatures like Bigfoot. And it’s the same with Ufology – there are cases here to investigate just like in the UK. But where I would say there is a very big difference is in the interpretation of the phenomena. I see a lot of more open-minded debate on the nature of the phenomena in the UK. In other words, in the UK I see more of an alternative approach and a willingness to follow alternative ideas and theories, such as themes concerning Tulpas, thought-forms, the ultra-terrestrial idea, rather than extraterrestrial etc. I would say in the US a lot of people view it from a far more black and white perspective – UFOs are nuts ands bolts craft and Bigfoot is a giant ape. Don’t get me wrong, there are people here who – like me – address these things from different angles. But, the “conventional” theories definitely hold more sway here. Maybe because they are popular, sell books, and get people to the conferences. That’s probably why my books sell in such small quantities – precisely because I don’t say what people want to hear. I say what I think is going on, and that’s not always popular or what people want to know LOL. But I don’t care. I’ll say it as I see it, not whether it’s popular or not.


From listening to and reading your interviews, it seems fair to say that philosophically you have an affinity with John Keel and Jacques Vallee, at least in terms of their willingness, if not insistence, to look beyond the “nuts and bolts” theories on UFOs and the “flesh and blood” theories in cryptozoology.  You yourself have an interesting thought regarding tulpas in relation to anomalous phenomena.  Could you expand on the influence of these two investigators/authors and also the tulpa theory?

Yeah, that’s true re having an affinity with Keel and Vallee, and more so Keel of the two. I first got into all this as a kid, when it was all black and white – UFOs were alien, cryptid creatures were all flesh and blood etc. But the more I dug into all this, the more I came to realise that these things weren’t just odd. Rather, they were too odd. Every Fortean phenomenon has one thing in common – they are all elusive. Bigfoot never gets hit by a car, never dies in the woods and is stumbled on etc. I don’t have a problem with Bigfoot being either fairly elusive or even overwhelmingly elusive. But I do have a problem when – in terms of capture etc – Bigfoot is elusive all the time , successfully on 100 percent of all occasions. The same goes for UFOs. So, over time, certainly from around my late 20s, my ideas changed and I came far more around to the ideas of Keel and Co that we are dealing with a very real phenomenon, but one that masquerades as this or that and that can alter the way we perceive it. As for Tulpas, yes, I have a big interest in this area. Basically the idea is that the human mind can externalise powerful imagery which can then take on some semblance of existence independent of the mind of its “creator.”

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